Tag Archives: 1920s

030 – Tom Whittaker’s Photographs (part two)





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028 – Very Good Seconds

Runner-up to Huddersfield in the League, then runners-up to Cardiff in the FA Cup, Chapman had elevated Arsenal to a team who were on the cusp of winning major honours. Today’s two scans come from ‘The Magnet Library’ in 1927 and ‘All Sports’ in 1928 and I’ve included them both as I think they give a good idea of exactly where we were on the eve of the 1930s, the second especially showing the change in policy at the club enacted by Chapman.


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027 – Charlie Buchan, £100 per goal.

Today’s scans feature Charlie Buchan. The story of his transfer fee consisting of a set fee and £100 per goal are well known and the three cartoons are from the Daily Herald. The last scan is the front of a dinner menu for The Press Club where Alfred Hitchcock was the guest of honour and our own George Allison the ‘Perdoocer’.




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026 – 1927 FA Cup Final

Finally, in 1927, we got to our first major cup final. Although it didn’t result in a win, as Tony Adams was to say (much) later it’s only by tasting defeat that you can enjoy the victories that will come. Two slightly different clips.

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025 – Here Comes Herbert

In the summer of 1925 Herbert Chapman took over as Arsenal’s new Manager. Using All Sports magazine again I thought it would be interesting to show a few scans over the summer to show what the general feeling may have been at the time. The photo of him I’ve scanned is from 1925 as well.









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024 – Boxers, Footballers, a Jockey and Tom Webster

Today’s first scan is a press photo from the early 1920s. The back slip says:

“Boxers Entertain Arsenal Players.
The Arsenal players spent the day at High Beech where George Cook, the Austaralian heavyweight boxer, entertained them with his full training exhibition yesterday (Friday). Frank Wootten, ghe famous jockey, was also there.
Photo shows the team watching George Cook (on right) sparring with Albert Lloyd.”

Both boxers were from Australia and toured England and Europe fighting. They were both in England at various times between 1921 and 1923 when I’d presume the photo was taken. The jockey Wootton (the correct spelling) became the youngest ever champion jockey at age 16 in 1919, and won it for the next three years.

The Tom Webster cartoon was first published in 1923, this version being from an annual of his cartoons published in 1924.


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023 – Jock Rutherford and the Arsenal Boot

Jock Rutherford is one of those names that many Arsenal fans recognise, but just as a name. In fact he was a true star of the age, and his signing in 1913 was a bit of a coup for the newly relegated Arsenal. He stayed at Arsenal until 1923 when he decamped for a brief spell as manager of Stoke City before returning to Arsenal a month later. He finally left Arsenal in 1926, setting a record that stands to this day for the oldest first team player at our club. His son (John) was also on Arsenal’s books at the same time, playing one game. The first scan is from ‘Sports Pictures’ magazine. Although the article below (from All Sports) has little about his career at Arsenal I think it’s a fascinating insight into what it was like to be a player then. I’ve also included an advert page from the same issue, as it features the ‘Arsenal Boot’.






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022 – Leslie Knighton’s team

As most will no doubt know Leslie Knighton was Arsenal’s manager immediately prior to Herbert Chapman. An interesting, open and popular man in football I’ve scanned an interview with him from Football Favourites magazine, and also a scan of a postcard of the 1920/21 teamgroup.


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021 – All Sports 1919/20

All Sports was a popular weekly sports tabloid of the inter-war years. Featuring the mixture of reports, interviews and gossip that we know so well today, it was one of the best selling weeklies of the time. I’ve scanned a history piece from 1919 which clearly shows even then they knew where the history was to be found in London, and a couple of clips from the start of the next season purely because I like the pictures!





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